Cassiopeia Region Wide Angle

Cassiopeia region including M31, wide angle view. 6×300 sec @ ISO 1600, Sigma 28-70 Zoom at 28mm, F/2.8, Astronomic CLS filter. North is to the right in this view.

By luck I framed this one with M31 and the Cassiopeia region and got all the good nebulae that were in the area to boot.  You can see the Heart and Soul Nebulae, the PacMan Nebula, emission nebula NGC 7822, and other smaller nebulae like the one near Gamma Cass.    The Double Cluster is there along with lots of other open clusters.

It is not the best lens and I did do some distortion correction in PS.  It was a little difficult to process since this was the first time I used the Astronomik CLS filter.   Before, I had one light pollution filter and two cameras, so I finally got another one so they both have one.    All I need now is a small mount for light loads like the setup I used here and I could get two cameras going at the same time.   Yeah, buddy!  🙂

North American Nebula Area – Wide Field

he North American Nebula Area. 10×300 sec @ ISO 1600, modified Canon XS, Astronomik CLS filter, Sigma Zoom 28-70 at 28mm, F/2.8.

I salvaged what I could of this one.   I had problems with the acquisition of the sub-images and it was mainly caused by dew.   I had to wipe the lens down several times and every time I did, the focus or focal length changed.    I was able to fix it by installing a dew heater strip on the lens, but that was not until the next set.

I gave up on these after an hour of fighting it.   I should have installed the heater before shooting, but I was in a rush to get data and there was not any dew problems in the beginning.

But, at least I got something out of it.   Anyway, here’s a portrait orientation version of the data with North at the top:

The North American Nebula Area. 10×300 sec @ ISO 1600, modified Canon XS, Astronomik CLS filter, Sigma Zoom 28-70 at 28mm, F/2.8. Portrait version.

The Milkyway From Darker Skies

1st shot of the night and I caught a small meteor. 1×180 sec @ ISO 1600, Canon XS (Modified,) Sigma 28-70 Zoom at 28mm, F/2.8, Astronomik CLS filter.    No calibration or processing of this image, except to set the black point and rotate the canvas.

Instead of my usual dead-end road site, I drove a few more miles west of there to a new site I’ve been wanting to try out.   It is only 50 minutes total trip time and you get a borderline Bortle 3/4 site with a really dark southern and southwestern horizon.

Milky Way. 1×180 sec @ ISO 1600, modified Canon XS, Astronomik CLS filter, Sigma Zoom 28-70 at 28mm, F/2.8.

The west is pretty dark, too, but there are various small light domes from the west-northwest to the north.   The northeast has a larger light dome from a metro area in that direction and the east has some smaller ones here and there.   There is a line of trees from the southeast to the northeast which blocks the LP from those areas, which is good.    But, it would not be the best place to shoot early morning comets, for instance, since you can’t see the eastern horizon very well because of those trees.

Milky Way. 8×180 sec @ ISO 1600, modified Canon XS, Astronomik CLS filter, Sigma Zoom 28-70 at 28mm, F/2.8. Used the 1×180 sec image as a base and it is mostly the bottom part of the image.

It is definitely dark there.  Rated a 0.22 radiance level on a light pollution map.   At one point, I might have glimpsed M33 naked eye, but I was not sure.    If it would have been more towards the west I’m pretty sure I could have seen it.   Moonrise was at midnight, so I quit early and did not get a chance to try for M33 when it was in that area of the sky.   Maybe next time!   😉

Crop of the Central Regions, 2×180 sec @ ISO 1600. Same lens and camera as the other images.

Comet Schaumasse and NGC 3489

24P/Schuamasse and NGC 3489. 27×180 sec @ ISO 3200, IDAS-LPS, TV-85 at F/5.6, Canon T3.

Not much detail for periodic comet 24P/Schaumasse, which was low to the horizon over a stronger LP dome when I started taking the sub-images for this shot.   I thought it might have a discernible tail that my camera might pick up since Cartes du Ceil showed it with one.  LoL!   Unfortunately, no software (or humans) can predict exactly what comets will do, which is why they make such good astrophotography targets.   😉

Comet 62P/Tsuchinshan

62P/Tsuchinshan on Oct 29, 2017, 09:17 UT. 8×180 sec @ ISO 3200, TV-85 at F/5.6, Canon T3, IDAS-LPS.  Star-Freeze version.  Close-crop at 100% resolution.
62P/Tsuchinshan on Oct 29, 2017, 09:17 UT. 8×180 sec @ ISO 3200, TV-85 at F/5.6, Canon T3, IDAS-LPS. Star-Streaks version. Cropped.

Here is a quickie of 62P/Tsuchinshan.  Only 8 sub-images, but it went deep enough to pick up a few faint fuzzies.   The comet was predicted to be dim, so I was not expecting much from it.   My main target this night was another comet just a few degrees away, which is why I did not spend much time on this guy.   But, it looks promising and I might try for it again soon.

There is something weird about this stack, though.   Some sort of artifact, maybe?   It looks like two tails, but I can’t be sure.   Its more apparent in a negative view of the star-streaks image:

62P_Tsuchinshan Star Streaks version negative view.

 

I also have a full-field, star-freeze view at 100% resolution.  It is more “pristine” than the other images with only minimal processing :

62P/Tsuchinshan on Oct 29, 2017, 09:17 UT. 8×180 sec @ ISO 3200, TV-85 at F/5.6, Canon T3, IDAS-LPS.

Images of Comets, Nebulae, Galaxies and Star Clusters