Category Archives: Moon

Last Quarter Moon on Oct 23, 2016

Waning Crescent Moon Mosaic on Oct 23, 2016. 17 panels, 6" F/8 Newtonian, Aptina AR0130 planetary cam.
Waning Crescent Moon Mosaic on Oct 23, 2016. 17 panels, 6″ F/8 Newtonian, Aptina AR0130 planetary cam.

Another moon mosaic for the month of October.  Since the weather was so clear on this early October morning, I decided to do some more planetary-style imaging with my new planetary/guider cam.   Decent seeing and as already mentioned, very transparent skies.   It was a little chilly, but not too bad when wearing two coats.    🙂

Moon Mosaic – October 14, 2016

The Moon on Oct 14, 2016. 25 panel mosaic taken with an Aptina AR0130 Color Guider/Cam and a 6 inch F/8 Newtonian.
The Moon on Oct 14, 2016. 25 panel mosaic taken with an Aptina AR0130 Color Guider/Cam and a 6 inch F/8 Newtonian.

I stitched this together with a little over two dozen, 1280×960 pixel images taken with my eyepiece planetary/guider cam and a 6″ dobsonian.  Reasonably good seeing this night.   When I saw that the stars were barely twinkling, I figured I better get some images while the getting was good.

I let the camera take an image every two seconds while I moved the scope from bottom to top of the target and let it drift across the field of view.  In all, I got about 334 images in RAW FIT format files, which I converted in IRIS.   I had to debayer them to get color and they came out really red, since I don’t have that specific camera in IRIS.   A Nikon seemed to be the closest match as far as conversion from RAW to RGB color.  IRIS  was able to apply the same color correction settings to each image in a batch mode and then I selected and manually exported select images into PSD format for PS.

It is not the best stitch-up job, since the moon rotated somewhat in the field of view between the first images and the last.  But, I think it is reasonably good for a few days worth of work.  I had to patch a few goofs and bad spots after the original posting.  One major one I didn’t catch until a few days after posting was the original image was backwards!    It seems the camera outputs mirror images in RAW format or it was possibly the FIT file format was encoded backwards.  I’m not sure.   I still have the RAW data, so I can put together another mosaic if I get bored one day.   🙂

The Moon on Oct 11, 2016

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Three first light images of the moon taken with new guider/planetary camera.

A new camera was used to take these new images of the moon.   A six inch Newtonian on a Dobsonian mount was used, so there was no tracking.   The camera used was an Aptina-based, AR0130 1.2Mp sensor eyepiece cam.   It has good low-light capability and a wide exposure range.

I hope to use it as a guide camera on a tracking mount and do double duty as a planetary/moon camera when hooked to one of my bigger scopes.  I can also use it to take some deep sky images with various other lenses or smaller scopes.  With the right scope, these types of cameras work great for small objects like planetary nebulae and small galaxies.

Crescent Moon, Sep 25, 2016

A Crescent Moon on September 25, 2016. 6 in F/8 Newtonian, 25mm Plossl, HTC 3.2 megapixel camera phone.
The Waning Crescent Moon on September 25, 2016. 6 in F/8 Newtonian, 25mm Plossl, HTC 3.2 megapixel camera phone.

I took this shot on the morning of September 25, 2016.  I was trying out my new Smartphone Digiscoping Adapter, which is a mount for most kinds of camera phones to a telescope.

The adapter was hooked to a 6″ F/8 Dobsonian with a 25mm Plossl eyepiece.  This device just clamps onto the barrel of any eyepiece and gets the lens of the camera phone centered right over the Continue reading Crescent Moon, Sep 25, 2016

The Moon on Sep 18, 2016

The Moon on Sep 18, 2016.
The Moon on Sep 18, 2016.
The Moon on Sep 18, 2016, version 2.
The Moon on Sep 18, 2016, version 2.

This is an afocal eyepiece projection image using a 25mm Plossl eyepiece, a 6 inch F/8 Newtonian and a HTC 3.2 megapixel camera phone.   The first image was sharpened in IRIS, then exported into PS and sharpened/enhanced some more.  The second image is maxed out sharpening, slightly overdone, perhaps.  lol

The Moon on November 1, 2014

The Moon on November 2nd, 2014. 1/500th sec @ ISO 100, TV-85 at F/5.6, IDAS-LPS, Modified Canon T3.
The Moon on November 2nd, 2014. 1/500th sec @ ISO 100, TV-85 at F/5.6, IDAS-LPS, Modified Canon T3.

A bright moon dominated the night sky on the evening of Nov 2nd, 2014.  I used it as a focusing target before starting to shoot DSO’s.  The image came out good enough to post here.

October 2014 Lunar Eclipse

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Lunar Eclipse on October 8, 2014. Shot with a JVC HD Video Recorder.

The eclipse of the Moon on October 8, 2014.    This was shot with a JVC HD Video Recorder.  I made stills of the moon from the movie clips I took.   Some were used to make this composite image.  I never tried a video camera before for an eclipse, so this was a learning experience.

Unfortunately, before the eclipse got going good, fog came in really heavy and the totality part of the eclipse was seen for just a minute or so.   Before I knew it, the moon had sank too low into the fog and was swallowed by it.    I barely got a shot off.  Oh, well… at least I did not scratch.  LoL  🙂

Comet Panstarrs & The Moon – March 12th, 2013

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Comet Panstarrs & The Moon, March 12, 2013

 

Possibly the most photogenic part of Comet Panstarrs apparition occurred on March 12, 2013 and luckily, I had clear weather.  I took a number of images, all with a Canon 200mm at F/2.8, a Canon XS (modified) and my little CG3 mount and a laptop.  This particular image is a 2 second exposure at ISO 800.

Continue reading Comet Panstarrs & The Moon – March 12th, 2013

Comet Panstarrs & The Moon 2

Comet Pan-STARRS and the Moon Above the Murk
Comet Pan-STARRS and the Moon Above the Murk

I shot this at the start of the session, before the comet and the moon sank too deep into the murk.   This is a one second exposure at ISO 200, Canon 200mm lens at F/2.8.   Lots of twilight still, but dark enough to show a good portion of the comet’s tail.